Types Of Flour
HIGH PROTEIN FLOUR

HIGH PROTEIN FLOUR, or strong flour, is milled from hard grain wheat and has protein content between 11-13.5%. The higher the flour’s protein content, the greater the flour’s gluten-forming potential in the dough, which then produces a bread loaf with good crumb structure.

MEDIUM PROTEIN FLOUR

MEDIUM PROTEIN FLOUR, is milled from a combination of soft and hard wheat. Its protein content is 9.5% – 10.5%. Its medium protein content offers just the right balance of strength and tenderness to make crumbly textured tarts and biscuits, short crust pastry and for making sauces.

LOW PROTEIN FLOUR

LOW PROTEIN FLOUR is milled from soft, lower protein wheat. Because of its small particle size, this flour produces fine & evenly textured cakes. Soft flour is usually divided into cake flour, which has the lowest gluten and biscuit flour which has slightly more gluten than cake flour when mixed with water. Gluten is responsible for the volume, texture and appearance of baked goods.

SELF-RAISING FLOUR

SELF-RAISING FLOUR has a low protein content of 8.0- 9.5%. This type of flour is usually blended with the right amount of leavening agent to produce quality cakes. In the presence of moisture and heat, the leaving agent reacts, producing carbon dioxide which is trapped as bubbles, which than forms the cake.

WHOLEMEAL FLOUR

WHOLEMEAL FLOUR is ground 100% from the entire wheat grain. It is high-fiber flour specially milled for the health-conscious consumers. Wholemeal flour cannot be kept for as long as white flour due to their slightly higher fat content.

 

CATEGORY FLOUR TYPE PROTEIN LEVEL
High protein flour High-gluten flour
Bread flour, Wantan noodle flour
13% and above
11 – 13%
Medium flour Noodle flour, Pau flour, All-purpose flour or plain flour, Pastry flour 9.5% – 10.5%
Low protein flour Biscuit flour, Cake flour 7.5% – 9%

Flour should be stored in a cool, dry place and preferably in a tightly sealed container. It can also be stored in the freezer using airtight containers or in freezer bags. It is important to allow the flour to thaw properly and equilibrate to room temperature prior to use, particularly when using recipes that require yeast.